30
May
2010

The Future Trilogy + AXIS XS

Sunday, May 30, 2010 - 8:30 pm
 
 
Programmed by cheyanne turions
Part of the Signal & Noise Media Arts Festival May 27-30
at VIVO Media Arts Centre, 1965 Main St. www.signalandnoise.ca
 
In November 2005, IKEA announced a new store opening in Edmonton, London to be accompanied by an offer of a significant price reduction on leather sofas. When 6000 people arrived to compete for the discount, a riot ensued, injuring 16 shoppers. The Future Trilogy takes this event as the starting point for a speculative history of a fictional future. The Future for Less imagines the consumer riot as the foundation of a new totalitarian state religion imposing the tenets of modernism on the masses. In Better Future, Wolf-Shaped a rural cult perverts this official creed through pagan rituals of architectural worship performed at Celtic burial sites in Cornwall. The Future is Now, stages the triumphant conquest of the industrial wasteland surrounding IKEA Edmonton, London as a popular uprising, revisiting the original riot as a future reenactment.
   
AXIS XS is an improvisation vocal-noise performance piece and digital opera, merging computer animation and shadow artworks to create a surrealist landscape of light and sound.  Hall’s vocal improvisations mimic a montage of vocal traditions, landscapes and machines to create new abstract narrative forms. 
 
Lief Hall, AXIS XS. 2010, 20min, Performance, Canada.
Pil & Galia Kollectiv, The Future for Less. 2006, 10 mins, DV, UK.
Pil & Galia Kollectiv, Better Future, Wolf-Shaped. 2008, 15 min, DV, UK.
Pil & Galia Kollectiv, The Future is Now. 2009, 23min, DV, UK.
 

ARTIST TALK
Saturday May 29, 2010 at 1pm
VIVO Media Art Centre 1965 Main St.

Lief Hall will be participating on an artist's panel titled "Unpacking My Records", at VIVO on Saturday May 29th at 1pm.

+

THOUGHT ON FILM
Monday May 31, 2010 at 6pm
Cineworks [1131 Howe, back lane entrance]
Free

A monthly reading + discussion group that  aims to promote critical thought around film product and practice through community-based discussion. Thought on Film fosters the close reading of texts confronting issues in contemporary, cutting-edge cinematic practice and philosophy. Provoked by the presentation of Pil & Galia’s The Future Trilogy, May’s gathering will feature Paolo Virno’s essay “Virtuosity and Revolution.”

___

The Pil and Galia Kollectiv are London based artists, writers and curators working in collaboration. Their work addresses the legacy of modernism and explores avant garde discourses of the twentieth century and the way they operate in the context of a changing landscape of creative work and instrumentalized leisure.  They are contributing editors at Art Papers and have written for many publications including Art Monthly and Mute. They have presented live work at the 2nd Herzliya Biennial, the 5th Berlin Biennial and the 5th Montreal Biennial, as well as at Late at Tate Britain. They have had solo shows at The Showroom, London and S1 Artspace, Sheffield, and their work has been exhibited in Apocatopia, Castlefield Gallery, Manchester and Roll it to Me, Collective Gallery, Edinburgh. They work as lecturers in Fine Art at the University of Kent.

Lief Hall, born 1981 in Nelson B.C. Canada, is an audio-visual artist, musician and curator living and working in Vancouver B.C.  Hall graduated from the Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design in 2005 with a Bachelors Degree in Integrated Media majoring in animation. Since then she has exhibited her video and performance works at such galleries as VIVO, Access Artist Run Centre, The Western Front, Helen Pitt and Truck Gallery.  Her latest film 25/27 was part of the Cartune Xprez DVD compilation which toured the United States and Canada. She was the curator of Lucky's Gallery from 2006-2008 and continues to organize art and music exhibitions independently.  Hall's current musical projects include improvisational sound art trio Glaciers, dark electro duo MYTHS and her self titled solo voice works.

Co-presented with the Signal & Noise Media Arts Festival, VIVO Media Arts Centre and Cineworks Independent Filmmakers Society.


      

05
Apr
2010

Ukrainian Time Machine: Living Films by Naomi Uman

Monday, April 5, 2010 - 8:30 pm

Programmed by Amy Kazymerchyk
Naomi Uman in attendance

Like a crochet needle swiftly passing through loops of silk and wool,  sun-thickened fingers prying at garlic-clove sheaths, or a chorus of wedding songs around a table of varenyky and boiled dumplings, Naomi Uman’s camera lives amongst the people, homes and villages she films. 

Setting out to retrace the footsteps of her family’s own immigrant history, Naomi, an American artist who divides her time between Los Angeles and Mexico City, made a reverse journey of her great-grandparent’s emigration from Uman, Ukraine.  She bought a house in Legedzine, just outside of Uman, toured films around the country, befriended village babushki, and established an artist residency for cultural exchange. 

The films in “Ukrainian Time Machine” evolved out of the tactile and visceral experience of living in Legedzine. Kalendar chronicles her early days of Ukrainian language lessons.  Clay is a portrait of a brick factory that sits atop the ruins of the 5000- year-old, clay-based Trypillian civilization. 

Unnamed Film contains footage, in chronological order, shot from the time she arrived in Legedzine to the time she left. “Ukrainian Time Machine” is the latest extension of an artistic practice that involves Uman’s prolonged immersion in the world of her subjects; in previous projects, she lived with a diary-farming family in rural Mexico and with a Mexican immigrant family employed in industrial dairy production in California.   
 
Kalendar. 2008, 10mins.
On This Day. 2008, 5mins.
Window. 2008, 3mins.
Coda. 2008, 3mins.
Clay. 2008, 12mins.
Unnamed Film. 2008, 55mins.

01
Apr
2010

Ryan Trecartin Artist Talk

Thursday, April 1, 2010 - 7:00 pm

 

At Emily Carr University of Art & Design
South Building Lecture Hall, Room 301- 1400 Johnston St. Granville Is. 
Co-presented by VIVO Media Arts Centre, ECU Spring 2010 Speakers Series and Fillip
 
Introductory Performance by Frederick Cummings accompanied by James Diamond
  
Ryan Trecartin was recently named winner of the Jack Wolgin International Competition in the Fine Arts, and New Artist of the Year by the Guggenheim Museum’s First Annual Art Awards. Trecartin will screen his forty-minute video P.opular S.ky (section ish) (2009) which will be followed by a discussion with Amy Kazymerchyk and the audience.
 
At once highly complex and fast-paced, Trecartin’s videos, which are usually exhibited within installations, place viewers inside exhilaratingly chaotic environments primed for post-racial, post-gender, and post-human encounters that collapse time, space, and identity into a layered and wholly unforgettable experience.

Robby Herbst presented his YTSSP essay Mediation, Self Marginalization and Post Politics in Protest Media at an offsite event at Studio 1202. You can view this essay here:

http://www.an-archivist.org/ytssp/?p=17

Pages